Japanese Language

This section is where you can find about the words/phrases I use.

Common phrases (to be used  – probably)

Ohayou gozaimasu – Good morning

Konnichiwa – Good afternoon / hello

Konbanwa – Good night

Arigatou – Thank you

Gomenasai / Gomen ne  – I’m sorry

Shitsurei Shimasu – Pardon me…(see comment below)

Watashi wa – I

Hai – yes

Iie – no

yokatta – thank goodness

yoi – good

o tanjobi omedeto – happy birthday

daisuki desu – I like it very much

Shinjirarenai – Unbelievable

Onegai shimasu – please

Doushite – Why?

Demo ne – But hey

Ganbatte – Good luck!

Sumimasen – Pardon me/Excuse me/I’m sorry/I apologize (more formal than gomen nasai, I was told)

Honto desu ka? – Really?/For real?

Honto – Really

Maji de? – really? (slang/informal)

Sou (desu ne) – I see…/It sure is!/I agree!

Sou (desu) ka? – Is that so…?

Nande…? – Why…? (informal)

Nan/nani? – What?

Dou? – How?

Itsu? – When?

Doko? – Where?

Doko iru no? – Where are you?

Doko iku no? – Where did you go?

Arimasu/Aru – it’s here (non-living things)

Imasu/Iru – I’m here/it’s here (people/living things)

Koko – here

Soko – there

Asoko – over there (further than “there”)

Kore – this

Sore – that

Are – that over there

Ii (desu yo) – good (more commonly used than “yoi”)

Ogenki desu ka?/Genki? – How are you?/Are you feeling well?

(Hai,) genki (desu) – I’m feeling well/I’m fine

Hajimemashite – How do you do? (used to introduce yourself to a stranger)

Douzo yoroshiku/Yoroshiku onegaishimasu – Nice to meet you

 

CREDITS : Adri (http://adriatastic.net) Thanks for the additions!

5 Comments »

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  1. Hiya, Adri (adriatastic on Arashian) here, found your blog from Arashian obviously haha!😛

    Maybe I can add a few words to your list? (for your future use LOL XD)

    Sumimasen – Pardon me/Excuse me/I’m sorry/I apologize (more formal than gomen nasai, I was told)

    Honto desu ka? – Really?/For real?

    Honto – Really

    Maji de? – really? (slang/informal)

    Sou (desu ne) – I see…/It sure is!/I agree!

    Sou (desu) ka? – Is that so…?

    Nande…? – Why…? (informal)

    Nan/nani? – What?

    Dou? – How?

    Itsu? – When?

    Doko? – Where?

    Doko iru no? – Where are you?

    Doko iku no? – Where did you go?

    Arimasu/Aru – it’s here (non-living things)

    Imasu/Iru – I’m here/it’s here (people/living things)

    Koko – here

    Soko – there

    Asoko – over there (further than “there”)

    Kore – this

    Sore – that

    Are – that over there

    Ii (desu yo) – good (more commonly used than “yoi”)

    Ogenki desu ka?/Genki? – How are you?/Are you feeling well?

    (Hai,) genki (desu) – I’m feeling well/I’m fine

    Hajimemashite – How do you do? (used to introduce yourself to a stranger)

    Douzo yoroshiku/Yoroshiku onegaishimasu – Nice to meet you

    That’s it for now. Don’t want to overwhelm you haha!

    Also, a correction. “Watashi wa” is actually “I am.” “Watashi” is just “I/me.”

    • Oh, another correction in your list. I just caught this too. It’s regards to “I’m sorry”

      It’s “gomen nasai,” not “gomenasai” (it’s 2 words, not 1 word). You can also use just plain “gomen” for “I’m sorry,” but it’s a bit more formal too.

      Also, another term: “Shitsurei shimasu”, which is an expression for someone to say “Pardon me for I’m about to do something that may offend or disturb or annoy you.” You pronounce it as (shtu-rei-shi-mas).

      I promised, I’d let you know the “suffix stem” rule referring to the people around you:

      “(name)-san” – Any person around you whom you may not be close with or a stranger you just met.

      “(name)-chan” – Best friend/BFF, girls, for mothers calling their children (son or daughter), younger brother, younger sister, younger cousin, kids younger than you, babies, pets, on certain occasions for girls when they refer to their boyfriends/fiances/husbands, but not always common

      “(name)-kun” – usually for young guys from little boys, teenage boys, college-aged/young adult boys. “-kun” is also used for bosses/supervisors referring to their employees (both men and women) at a business/office setting, a sports team, the police, or the military

      “(name)-fujin” – “Mrs. (name)” For someone’s wife, obviously.

      “(name)-neesan/-neechan/-nee” – Older sister, older female cousin, a girl/woman older than you (to us Filipinos, it’s the equivalent to “ate”)

      “(name)-niisan/-niichan/-nii” – Older brother, older male cousin, a boy/man older than you (to us Filipinos, it’s the equivalent to “kuya”)

      For Japanese, the only time that you can call them by their first names is only is when you are very close to them in relationships. For those who are in love (especially to the girls), if the one they’re in love with asks them to just call them by their first name (without the -san/-kun/-chan/whatever), they automatically know that they truly mean something special to them. Otherwise, they would find it rude if someone calls them by their first name without their permission or consent.

      More to come later ROFL.

  2. The last paragraph… aww…

    thank you very much Adri-chan! There, I used it.

    Thank you very much. I’ve learned a lot I never knew before. 🙂🙂 Yey!

  3. atashi mo nanika shitte iru! another term for arigatou is, “kansha”😉
    kansha shitai — i want to thank you
    kansha ne – thank you, “ne”

    ne, i see that you studied at Santa Isabel College and is currently studying at Concordia College.. sister school of abel right? and there was an event called, “exchange students” deshou? im sure you know Ana Padilla?🙂

    sorry for the sudden message! got your blog from addie-chan🙂

    • no… I don’t know her. But thanks for the words! Will add them next time!🙂


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